This offers an interesting place for Trudeau and Trump to align, especially because […] Trump has long been a supporter of an end to the drug wars.

– David Woolley

Allie, Colin and David talk about the Special Committee on Electoral Reform, Trudeau’s comments on negotiating NAFTA with Trump, and the opioid crisis in Canada.

 

Special Committee on Electoral Reform: No Traction

The Special Committee isn’t inspiring a lot of confidence recently. After conducting consultations with Canadians across the country, the Committee is maintaining that there is no consensus amongst the general population on a preferred electoral system. Word on the street begs to differ – apparently, Canadians are in favour of proportional representation. On top of this, the Liberals have indicated their preference for a ranked ballot system before. So naturally, people and politicians are assuming the Committee is obfuscating the consultation results so that they can push their own agenda.

The Conservatives have stated from the get-go that they think the whole thing should be put to a referendum – however, in the past these have always resulted in no change. Since the Liberals have promised that 2015 was Canada’s last first-past-the-post election, they don’t want to go the referendum route. Earlier in the year the NDP wasn’t sold on the idea either, but this week NDP Nathan Cullen, a member of the Committee, said that he agreed on the need for a referendum. Basically, all signs are suggesting that the promise of electoral change may not be one that the Liberals can pull off.

 

Trump, Trudeau and NAFTA: Traction

This week Trudeau commented that he would be ‘happy’ to talk with Trump about NAFTA. Trump has been vocal on his desire to renegotiate – or even completely abandon – the agreement. NAFTA has been around for 22 years, so a renegotiation could be a big change for Canada, and both the NDP and Conservatives felt Trudeau seemed eager to open these talks.

So far, Trump hasn’t mentioned NAFTA in his 100-day plan for when he takes office, but he did mention the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. The President-elect has stated that he will quit the TPP, which will essentially quit the TPP for everyone – the agreement needs the US to ratify it for it to move forward.

 

Opioid Crisis: The Most Traction

Over the past year, opioid-related deaths have continued to climb, and now the medical community is urging the federal government to declare a national public health emergency. Doing so would empower chief medical officers and move the issue out of the political sphere. This week Federal Health Minister Jane Philpott and Ontario Health Minister Dr. Eric Hoskins held an Opioid Conference and Summit in Ottawa to discuss the crisis and determine the best strategy for moving forward. Philpott has stated that she is open to declaring it a health emergency if it is appropriate and helpful for addressing the crisis.

 

 

Top 3 Links Shared Online

  1. Calgary drug lab with capacity to produce 263k fentanyl pills shut down by police
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  3. Liberals Are Misleading Canadians on Electoral Reform